Polar bears are smarter than giraffes

Interesting facts about animals

Interesting facts about polar bears

Distribution and habitat:
The polar bear lives where it is cold, in the Arctic.
Behavior and senses:
The polar bear is related to the brown bear. The polar bear gives birth to her cubs in self-dug ice caves and takes them around for a long time. Polar bears are loners. However, if a stranded whale is found, up to 30 or 40 animals occasionally gather and eat their fill together.
Food:
The polar bear eats seals and fish, but does not disdain even the smallest prey. However, the polar bear prefers to hunt seals.
Anatomy:
He has a white and yellowish fur that is transparent. Polar bears grow up to 2.50 m long and weigh up to 400 kg. You have mighty paws.
Movement:
The polar bears are on the move almost all year round. In winter, when the ice expands, they move south and in summer, when it recedes, they move north. They are excellent swimmers and divers. You do yourself well as runners, your top speed is 40 kilometers per hour and you can cover up to 70 kilometers a day, swimming, running or hitchhiking on ice floes.
Reproduction:
Polar bears are mammals. The polar bear traditionally withdraws to her self-dug birth cave in November. In December, 2 to 3 naked, blind and deaf cubs are born there, who in their first two years of life learn from their mother everything that an adult polar bear needs to know.
Miscellaneous:
The polar bears can live to be up to 30 years old. The polar bears are not directly threatened with extinction.

Samantha

Interesting facts about elephants

Distribution and habitat:
The elephants live in warm areas. But only if there is water nearby. In Africa they can only survive in nature parks.
Behavior and senses:
The elephants use their ears as fans. They use their long trunks to take in water or to graze on their favorite meal, the grass.
Food:
The elephants eat grass, branches, roots and fruits Elephants need at least 150 kg of plants and 80 liters of water per day. They eat 17-19 hours a day. A fully grown bull eats 170 kg of plants per day.
Anatomy:
The Asian elephant differs from the African elephant in its smaller ears and smooth skin. Only the Asian male elephant has tusks. The tusks prevent the elephant from coming upside down, so it has the trunk. The trunk is used to pick up even the smallest objects and can suck up up to 10 liters of water. The elephants can grow up to 4 m high and weigh up to 7000 kg.
Movement:
The elephants stamp everything that comes in their way. They can reach a speed of 40 km / h. But that only happens when they feel threatened.
Reproduction:
The baby elephants grow up under the loving care of their mother.
Miscellaneous:
The elephants are the strongest and heaviest mammals that live on land.

Chris and Steve

Interesting facts about giraffes

Distribution and habitat:
The giraffe lives in Africa. It is the tallest mammal in the world.
Behavior and senses:
The giraffe has large black and sharp eyes. She is able to see a man two kilometers away.
Food:
The giraffe eats for twelve hours every day. She eats the leaves of the trees because she is a vegetarian. The giraffe eats 60 kilos of leaves and fruit every day. She drinks 15 liters of water in one go.
Anatomy:
The giraffe has a yellow-brown fur. The brown pieces of fur look like a puzzle. It also has a very long neck with seven cervical vertebrae. If the giraffe wants to bend down to drink water, it has to spread its legs very wide and almost give a curtsey.
Movement:
The giraffe marches five to six km an hour and can go up to 35 km / h. When walking, the giraffe alternately lifts the front and rear legs of the same side at the same time.
Reproduction:
The giraffe is a mammal. After 15 months of gestation, she gives birth to a 2 m tall and 60 kg heavy boy. When the cub is at least 16 months old, it is already a young giraffe and leaves its mother to live in a group with two or three other giraffes.
Miscellaneous:
The tongue of the giraffe is 50 cm long and completely black. The giraffe's neck is three meters long. The young giraffe grows 8 inches each week for the first month of its life.

Fernand

Interesting facts about camels

Distribution and habitat:
Camels have spread to Africa, Asia, and South America. Camels have also made a name for themselves in Australia. Camels were used as pack animals in the past to build roads and train lines. After all, the ruminants had no problems with temperatures.
Behavior and senses:
Camels are long-legged, long-necked steppe and desert animals that belong to the order of the artifacts. Camels are ruminants. They are pack animals like elephants. Depending on the load, camels can do without water for between 14 and 27 days, then the huge animals drink up to 120 liters within a very short time. Camels are passers-by, i.e. they put front and rear legs forward on one side of the body at the same time. Large flat feet prevent sinking into the sand. The nostrils close in sand and dust storms in the deserts and steppes.
Food:
Camels eat leaves and drink water.
Anatomy:
Camels have long legs, but not as long as the giraffes. The camels use the humps as storage, but not for water, but for fat. Well-fed camels can be recognized by their plump and upright humps.
Movement:
Camels can run fast, but they cannot walk fast.
Reproduction:
The camel is a mammal.
Miscellaneous:
Camels can weigh up to 1000 kg. There are 3 types of camels: the trample, the dromedary and the llama. Camels are smart and can remember a lot, especially if someone has hurt them. Danger! Camel vengeance can be dangerous.

Sammy

Interesting facts about kangaroos

Distribution and habitat:
Kangaroos are native to Australia. But you can also see them in zoos.
Behavior and senses:
Kangaroos are fast runners. They can jump well too.
Food:
Kangaroos eat plants and drink water.
Anatomy:
Kangaroos have large hind feet. They also have a pouch on their stomach.
Movement:
Kangaroos can run up to 88 km / h. The jump distance is 1.20 to 1.90 m. On the run, jumps of 9 m and more are sometimes achieved. The jump height is over 3 m.
Reproduction:
After about 30-40 days of gestation, the embryo, which usually weighs only 0.75 g, crawls independently into the mother's pouch, where it then spends the first part of its life. In favor of this development, the hormone cycle in the female kangaroo has a longer gestagen phase at the expense of a very short phase of conception. The mating males must determine this point in time by regular sniffing and urine tests if their efforts are to be successful with the female.
Miscellaneous:
The mother kangaroo carries the baby kangaroo in her pouch, which is on her stomach.

Ken

Interesting facts about koalas

Distribution and habitat: Koalas are "bears" that live on eucalyptus trees and feed on eucalyptus leaves. There is only one country in the world, Australia.
Food:
There are over 100 different types of eucalyptus trees and the koala only feeds on 5-10 of these species.
Behavior and senses:
A normal daily routine for a koala consists of 1-2 hours of eating, 1-2 hours of walking, about 15 minutes of cleaning, and 18-21 hours of resting, digesting, and sleeping. If the koala has to digest long and hard, it is because eucalyptus leaves do not provide enough nutrients. So he has to chew and digest it well in order to get enough energy from food and not to starve.
Anatomy:
Koalas are around 50 cm tall and weigh between 8-12 kg. Like the kangaroos, they have a pouch. They therefore belong to the marsupials.
Movement:
The koalas are mainly in the eucalyptus trees. If they are in danger, they can climb a 30 m high tree in seconds. You run at least 1km per hour.
Reproduction:
The female carries her young in her pouch. The habitat of the koalas is becoming more and more restricted by the settlement and the felling of the eucalyptus forests, so that today there are less than 100,000 koalas.
Miscellaneous:
Koalas are the role models for our teddy bears. They can also be pretty quick when they're in danger.

Vito and Pedro

Interesting facts about crocodiles

Distribution and habitat:
There are freshwater and saltwater crocodiles in Australia. The crocodile caiman lives in Central and South America.
Behavior and senses:
Saltwater crocodiles are dangerous to humans. Freshwater crocodiles are harmless to humans. Crocodiles have a voice! They use it even before they hatch to tell their mother that they want to get out of the egg. She buried the eggs in the sand to protect them from enemies.
Food:
The long-snouted Gaviale live mainly on fish, other species also prey on land animals that are dragged into the water and drowned.
Anatomy:
Saltwater crocodiles can grow up to 7.5 meters long. Freshwater crocodiles are only 2.5 meters long.
Movement:
All crocodile species live in the water, but descend from ancestors walking on their hind legs, some of which even lived in trees.
Reproduction:
The crocodiles are the last living group of large dinosaurs and are more closely related to birds than to other reptiles. Crocodiles are reptiles.
Miscellaneous:
Crocodiles are also called armored lizards because they have strong bone plates under their outermost skin layer.

Philippe Schreiner

Interesting facts about parrots

Distribution and habitat:
The parrots live in Africa and in the rainforests. Like woodpeckers, they cut a nest in the tree with their beak.
Behavior and senses:
They sit in the trees most of the day or they fly from one tree to another. The parrots are very intelligent. At the slightest danger, they fly away.
Food:
They eat fruits and insects. But they prefer to eat fruit.
Anatomy:
The parrots have colored plumage. They have wings up to 50 cm long. Their feathers are mostly of the following colors: blue, red, green and yellow.
Movement:
The parrots fly very quickly. Their speed is up to 50 km / h.
Reproduction:
When the parrots fall in love, they dance. They lay up to 3-5 eggs.
Miscellaneous:
There are many different species of parrots.

Maurizia and Max

Interesting facts about penguins

Distribution and habitat:
The penguins live in cold regions like Antarctica but they also live by the sea of ​​the North Pole.
Behavior and senses:
Penguins are birds of the sea. In contrast to their flying relatives, penguins have heavy tubular bones filled with marrow.
Food:
The penguins mostly eat fish eggs, plankton, small squids and sardines. They spear their prey fish with their pointed beaks.
Anatomy:
Penguins have flat feet, stubby wings and pointed beaks. Their body color is black, yellow and white. They almost look like they're wearing a black tuxedo.
Movement:
The penguins waddle to get around. They seem awkward in doing so. You also slide on your stomach on the ice. But when penguins reach water, they swim. They whiz through the water at speeds of up to 25 kilometers per hour.
Reproduction:
The penguins are not mammals. The female lays the eggs and passes them on to the male, who then hatches them.
Miscellaneous:
The penguin cannot fly with its stubby wings.

Lara and Nora

Interesting facts about seals

Distribution and habitat: Seals live in both the Arctic and the Antarctic.
Behavior and senses:
They lie on the rocks all day or they stay in the sea all day.
Food:
The seals eat shrimp, clams, octopus and fish such as herrings, plaice, flounder and of course cod.
Anatomy:
The males weigh up to 350 kg and the females weigh up to 200 kg. They grow up to 1m high.
Movement:
Seals are excellent swimmers and perfect divers, able to spend even long periods of time in freezing waters
Reproduction:
The seals are mammals.
Miscellaneous:
Sharks and killer whales must be mentioned as natural enemies.

Pedro and Vito

Interesting facts about the tiger

Distribution and habitat:
The tiger lives in Asia.
Behavior and senses:
He's the biggest cat of all. Before the tiger attacks, it puts its ears up and turns them forward. When hunting, it sneaks up to its prey from behind up to 10 to 25 m. Its fur is a camouflage. The big cat does not get up before dusk. The tigers can cover up to 30 km in one hunting night.
Food:
In the water, the tiger grabs fish or turtles when he's hungry. The tiger is a carnivore: wild cattle, antelopes, deer, small animals, frogs and even grasshoppers are on its menu.
Anatomy:
The Siberian tiger is a big cat with brown-yellow to rust-brown fur with dark stripes. Its fur is yellowish in winter. It weighs around 280 kg and can grow to a height of 105 cm.
Movement:
The nose is of no use when hunting. The tiger needs the ears to hunt. The tiger is a very fast animal. It is the largest big cat.
Reproduction:
The tigers can begin mating between the ages of 3 to 5 years. The tigers mate all year round and have up to 7 cubs.
Miscellaneous:
A tiger cannot live to be more than 25 years old.

Noémie

Interesting facts about wolves

Distribution and habitat:
Wolves live in the snowy areas of Alaska, but are also at home in hot Spain and India. The ancestors of the wolf were carnivores that lived on the North American continent 100 to 120 million years ago. Wolves mostly live in packs. In Europe there are usually no more than ten wolves in a pack.
Behavior and senses:
Wolves have relatively poor eyesight. You can only identify the members of your own pack up to a distance of 30-50 m. The expressive facial features and the ears are therefore of great importance for the wolves' mutual perception. The dark or night vision of wolves surpasses that of humans by far. By far the most important sense for wolves is their sense of smell. As far as we know today, this is at least 100 to 1000 times more pronounced than that of humans. Under good conditions, wolves can smell prey up to 3 km away. Wolves have highly developed hearing. You can hear sounds up to 10 km away, even high-frequency sounds that no human can hear, such as the sounds of bats and porpoises. Even when they sleep, wolves prick up their ears to hear any noises around them.
Food:
When there are no large game, wolves hunt small animals too. Beavers are an important source of food. Some wolves pass on to hares and squirrels as prey. Others look for ducks, geese and other birds. If a wolf can't find anything else, it will eat mice itself. Wolves, however, prefer to hunt larger prey. They mainly hunt red deer, stag or ibex. Wolves do not always hunt the selected prey. If there is hardly anything to eat, the wolf can "stay afloat" for a long time with berries, roots and other vegetable foods. While it is primarily a carnivore, it also relies on vitamins and other important components of plant foods.
Anatomy:
The wolf bite consists of 42 teeth. The fangs can be up to 6 cm long, measured from root to tip. They help the wolf to get hold of the prey.
Movement:
When walking, the wolf keeps its paws clenched in order to reduce the tread surface and friction. Wolves walk on their toes. As a result, they lengthen their runs and reach a higher speed (up to a maximum speed of approx. 65 km / h).
Reproduction:
When spring comes, Mother Wolf looks for a suitable place to dig a cave. Here, after the gestation period of 61-63 days, she will give birth to her 4-7 puppies. The puppies are born deaf and blind and are suckled by their mother.Only after about three weeks do the baby wolf cautiously dare to venture out of the cave to take a look into the daylight. About a quarter of the animals born do not reach adulthood. This also explains why wolves have to have so many babies. The puppies are suckled by the mother until they are three months old. They already have sharp, pointy teeth, which doesn't make it any easier for Mother Wolf. During this time the wolf children are also used to carnal food. The lead wolf and the lead wolf are the only wolves in the pack that have offspring. The puppies are looked after by the whole pack.
Miscellaneous:
There is a strict hierarchy among adult wolves. Certain gestures and behaviors ensure that this hierarchy and thus the cohesion in the pack is maintained. The pack members show clear humility towards the two lead wolves.

Tom and Sam

Interesting facts about zebras

Distribution and habitat:
Zebras live in Africa. They live in groups of up to 20 animals. 15 animals form a family. They live in savannahs. The zebras settle near rivers. Each family has a stallion and several mares with foals.
Behavior and senses:
Very often you can see zebras in company with antelopes, especially wildebeest. On the run from the predators, they can cover long distances at a gallop.
Food:
The zebras feed on hard grasses that are spurned by antelopes.
Anatomy:
Zebras have a striped pattern. The stripes look confusing from a distance. Zebras look like horses.
Movement:
The zebras gallop. When a predator attacks them, they gallop at full speed.
Reproduction:
Zebras have 1-2 young. When two stallions fall in love with the same female, a fight is fought.
Miscellaneous:
The young zebra is about 85 cm tall at birth and can jump away just 2 hours after it is born.

Maurizia and Max